Cytokine Signalling Forum

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Cytokines and Cytokine Signalling in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Developed under the auspices of the University of Glasgow supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Pfizer Italia S.r.l.

This EACCME-accredited course is a 1-hour tutorial that has been designed as an educational resource for qualified rheumatologists of all levels of seniority to facilitate an increased understanding of cytokines and their role in rheumatoid arthritis, and learn about new and developing therapeutic options that target cytokine signalling pathways. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disabling disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the advent of biologic therapy, many patients experience progressive joint damage and decline in physical functioning. Novel approaches, especially for patients resistant to biologics, are urgently needed. New small molecule inhibitors of intracellular signalling pathways offer a new therapeutic option for rheumatoid arthritis.

By following this programme, members of the Cytokine Signalling Forum will be able to:

  • Explain the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis
  • Understand the way cytokines exert their function and the role of intracellular signalling pathways
  • Recognise the role of cytokine signalling as a therapeutic option for management of rheumatoid arthritis

APEX 2015 Health Awards spring 2015

Module Présentateur Vidéo Questions
Introduction
Professor Iain B. McInnes image
Professor Iain B. McInnes

Vice Principal and Head of College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences (MVLS),
University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK

Professor Iain McInnes is the Vice Principal and Head of College of MVLS in the University of Glasgow, UK. He is also the leading trans-national society for rheumatology across Europe.

Professor McInnes studied medicine at the University of Glasgow and graduated with honours in 1989 before training in internal medicine and rheumatology. He completed his membership of the Royal College of Physicians (MRCP) in 1992 and became a fellow (FRCP) in 2003. He completed his PhD and post-doctoral studies via fellowships from the Wellcome Trust, the Arthritis Research Campaign (ARC, UK) and the National Institute of Health (NIH) Fogarty Fellowship Programme in both Glasgow and Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

He has extensive experience in leading multicentre programmes, nationally and internationally. Professor McInnes is also Director of the Scottish MRC Clinical Pharmacology and Pathology Clinical PhD Training Programme; Chief Investigator for the Scottish Early RA Cohort (SERA) and the related SMS-IC biomarker discovery programme (PROMISERA); and Chief Investigator of numerous global phase II and III clinical trials of novel immune therapies

His major interest is in the biology of inflammatory synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and septic arthritis. He operates on a translational science programme in which state of the art cellular and molecular biology techniques are applied to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the perpetuation of a range of chronic diseases seeking to build precision medicine approaches and new therapeutics thereafter. He received the Sir James Black Prize Medal, a prestigious award in medicine in 2016 by the Royal Society of Edinburgh for his outstanding contribution to the field of immunology. In 2019, Professor McInnes was awarded a CBE for his services to Medicine.

Prof. Iain B. McInnes (Bio)
01:43
The role of cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis
Professor Pierre Miossec image
Professor Pierre Miossec

Professor of Clinical Immunology,
Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France

Professor Pierre Miossec received his medical degree from Brest University Hospital in 1983, and then worked as a research fellow at the Department of Internal Medicine, Rheumatic Diseases Unit, University of Texas. He received his PhD in Immunology from the University of Marseille in 1987 before going on to work as Associate, and later Professor, of Clinical Immunology at the Claude Bernard University, Lyon.

Professor Miossec’s main research interests include the role of cytokines and T cells in arthritis. He was part of the group to first identify interleukin-1 in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. He was also the first to identify the destructive properties of interleukin-17, and to introduce the concept of its production by a new T cell subset. He received the prestigious Carol Nachman prize in 2010 for this contribution. Professor Miossec is an editorial board member of many journals in the field of arthritis.

Prof. Pierre Miossec (Bio)
28:17 10
Kinases and their role in targeting cytokines - the theory in the clinic
Professor Iain B. McInnes image
Professor Iain B. McInnes

Vice Principal and Head of College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences (MVLS),
University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK

Professor Iain McInnes is the Vice Principal and Head of College of MVLS in the University of Glasgow, UK. He is also the leading trans-national society for rheumatology across Europe.

Professor McInnes studied medicine at the University of Glasgow and graduated with honours in 1989 before training in internal medicine and rheumatology. He completed his membership of the Royal College of Physicians (MRCP) in 1992 and became a fellow (FRCP) in 2003. He completed his PhD and post-doctoral studies via fellowships from the Wellcome Trust, the Arthritis Research Campaign (ARC, UK) and the National Institute of Health (NIH) Fogarty Fellowship Programme in both Glasgow and Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

He has extensive experience in leading multicentre programmes, nationally and internationally. Professor McInnes is also Director of the Scottish MRC Clinical Pharmacology and Pathology Clinical PhD Training Programme; Chief Investigator for the Scottish Early RA Cohort (SERA) and the related SMS-IC biomarker discovery programme (PROMISERA); and Chief Investigator of numerous global phase II and III clinical trials of novel immune therapies

His major interest is in the biology of inflammatory synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and septic arthritis. He operates on a translational science programme in which state of the art cellular and molecular biology techniques are applied to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the perpetuation of a range of chronic diseases seeking to build precision medicine approaches and new therapeutics thereafter. He received the Sir James Black Prize Medal, a prestigious award in medicine in 2016 by the Royal Society of Edinburgh for his outstanding contribution to the field of immunology. In 2019, Professor McInnes was awarded a CBE for his services to Medicine.

Prof. Iain B. McInnes (Bio)
23:27 10
Evaluation 4

Date de préparation: June 2013